NEWS: Repro demands from papers anger industry

The trade bodies for clients and agencies are to join forces in a concerted campaign against what some industry figures have labelled the ‘dictatorial’ demands of national newspaper publishers over the supply of colour reproduction.

The trade bodies for clients and agencies are to join forces in a

concerted campaign against what some industry figures have labelled the

‘dictatorial’ demands of national newspaper publishers over the supply

of colour reproduction.



Both the Incorporated Society of British Advertisers and the Institute

of Practitioners in Advertising claim that they are being railroaded by

some publishers into using a single designated supplier for colour ads -

a practice they say that restricts commercial choice. They also claim

that it takes quality control away from the agency and client.



Tim Hannon, creative services director at BMP DDB Needham and chairman

of the IPA’s creative services committee, said it was common for

agencies to receive only one colour proof of an ad before it went to

press and that repro prices were often non-negotiable.



‘We are being presented with take-it-or-leave-it colour at a take-it-or-

leave-it price,’ he said. Hannon also expressed concern about the

imposition of earlier copy deadlines which, if missed, could lead to no

proof whatsoever being made available.



ISBA’s press committee meets next week to discuss the issue. Dominic

Owens, the advertising and corporate identity manager of the Prudential

and chairman of the committee, said: ‘We share the IPA’s worries. We are

very unhappy about this.’



Owens added that the changes to copy deadlines could destroy the short-

term colour ad market.



ISBA and the IPA are proposing that publishers select three approved

suppliers and let agencies choose between them for individual jobs.



Jeremy Reed, ad director on the Independent and the Independent on

Sunday, defended the publishers’ position. ‘To ensure consistency of

colour quality, we need consistency of colour reproduction.’



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