Newspaper Advertising - The Creative Potential: Carvalho Hosken - Rio de Janeiro

BACKGROUND

Artplan, an independent Brazilian agency, was behind this campaign.

The two ads appeared at the end of 2004 in a local newspaper in Rio, where the real-estate company Carvalho Hosken was looking to sell 20 apartments in a new development. The ads ran for four weeks, two weeks longer than originally planned.

The attention-grabbing campaign presented an opportunity for a hard sell - to tell people that they could move in right away. Carvalho Hosken sold 50 per cent of the flats in the first month of marketing.

Roberto Vilhena, the creative director at Artplan, says: "This kind of idea means it's possible to write 500 lines about the apartment, the prices and so on. The visual idea is just a part of it. The client can have a lot of words about his product and it is good for my portfolio."

Artplan is ranked in the top 20 agencies in Brazil. Although it strives for creativity and has been recognised at Cannes, it is not a high-profile creative shop.

A creative approach to real-estate advertising is unusual in many markets; property ads are rarely eye-catching. But real estate does account for a large percentage of all newspaper advertising. In Brazil, property advertising accounted for about 12 per cent of all display ad revenues in newspapers in 2004.

Brazil is the only country in South America with a substantial newspaper market, boasting 465 paid-for dailies, the top-selling titles being broadsheets.

Chile comes a not-so-close second with 53. Newspaper advertising in Brazil took 21.5 per cent of all ad revenue in 2004, so press is a key consideration in any media plan.

REVIEW - Alexandre Okada regional creative director Latin America, Leo Burnett

Sunday, unlike any other, is the day one most associates with the newspaper.

There's nothing like waking up late and having a nice breakfast while reading your favourite paper. And the Sunday edition is unique: it's always bigger, jam-packed with lots of sections, lots of promotions and, above all, lots of information. Even more, one likes to read several papers in order to get different points of view on the same subject.

This is where a great newspaper ad stands out from the rest. It's not easy to compete with the week in review, the Sunday magazine or, especially, the sports section. To imagine an ad within this "make or break" environment really helps separate the good from the great. Some classic ads pass this mental test really well. Who doesn't remember the Volkswagen Polo ad consisting of a full page of blank space with a message from the paper refusing to publish an ad with what was obviously the wrong price tag for the car?

The campaign the Brazilian agency Artplan created for a real-estate launch is another great example.

Two simple, highly relevant ads with real stopping power. Leveraging the characteristics of the medium to their fullest - and starting from a truly Brazilian insight that people wrap up everything in newspaper when they move - the agency creates a trompe l'oeil effect. This surprises and then invites readers to make use of the paper to prepare for their move to the Rio 2 condominium.

In a medium where ads frequently shout at people, doing everything possible to grab their attention, it's gratifying to turn a page and come across an ad like this. The sports news can wait. Right now, all my attention is focused on the Rio 2 condominium. Simple, effective, impactful, graphically interesting. What more can you ask of a newspaper ad on a lazy Sunday morning?

CREDITS Titles: "Ashtray", "Glass" Project: Rio 2 apartments Client: Carvalho Hosken Agency: Artplan, Rio de Janeiro Writer: Roberto Vilhena Art director: Alessandra Sadock Creative directors: Roberto Vilhena, Jorge Falsfein Photographer: Hamdan