Nike steps away from its classic advertising formula

Social video experts Be On reviews the latest viral by Nike.

"The spot takes a brave new direction with its use of dry humour and critique of the very generation that purchases its products"


7/10

For all of those guilty of declaring there simply isn’t enough hours in the day to exercise, they might want to consider Nike’s latest spot for inspiration.

According to Nike, consumers will happily spend "10 hours a day" glued to their screens, scrolling through other people’s photos, binging on TV shows or falling down the YouTube video vortex.

Nike summarises all of these activities in a minute-long ad, using its distinctive white font to type out the many guilty pleasures that typically take up nearly 10 hours of consumers’ spare time.

The catch is revealed at the end, as Nike asks "Are we running today?", leaving viewers with little excuse not to exercise.

The spot takes a brave new direction with its use of dry humour and critique of the very generation that purchases its products. After all, it’s those avid Snapchatters and Desperate Housewives’ fans that are likely to buy a new pair of their kicks this holiday season.

Notably, Nike boldly moves away from its classic advertising formula that aims to inspire consumers through personal storytelling, impressive visuals, top sports talent and positivity.

For example, it's Unlimited You spots, showcase the many obstacles athletes overcome throughout their sporting careers and demonstrating how determination and hard work pays off. Instead, the brand has now piggybacked onto the digital detox trend, which encourages unplugging over being glued to your beloved tech devices.

Earlier this year, Dolmio’s Wi-Fi disabling pepper hacker ad successfully demonstrated how families can reconnect over a gadget-free dinnertime. The ad was well received by its audience.

While Nike’s willingness to venture outside of its own comfort zone needs to be acknowledged, the validity of its argument is somewhat questionable. For example, aren’t ads (even one minute ones) also one of the sources keeping viewers glued to their screens? And as the pioneers of the Nike+ FuelBand, one of the first ever fitness trackers, the brand also relies on the very levels of hyper connectivity it criticises.

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