O&M push aims to make magistrate’s job attractive to all

Ogilvy & Mather has created a campaign for the Central Office of Information and the Lord Chancellor’s Department to encourage ordinary people to become magistrates.

Ogilvy & Mather has created a campaign for the Central Office of

Information and the Lord Chancellor’s Department to encourage ordinary

people to become magistrates.



The press campaign aims to challenge the commonly held perception that

only stiff professionals with certain strict qualifications can become

magistrates. Six press ads feature people with normal jobs including a

fireman, aerobics instructor, courier and air hostess. Each ad

demonstrates that on top of their day job, they are also

magistrates.



The copy emphasises that the skills required for the magistracy are

personal qualities, such as commonsense, integrity, and an open mind,

which cross all ages, classes and ethnic groups.



It reads: ’It doesn’t matter what you do or where you come from, all you

need to become a magistrate are the right personal qualities.’ It then

supplies a phone number for more information.



John Lane-Gilhespy, assistant secretary of commissions at the Lord

Chancellor’s Department, said: ’There is a misconception that you need a

particular educational qualification and that being a magistrate is not

something that ordinary people do. It’s that kind of stereotype we’re

trying to break. We have a broad mix of magistrates, and we’re trying to

improve it.’



The campaign breaks on 15 March and will run for one month in the

national and ethnic press, women’s weeklies and TV listings magazines.

Media planning was by MindShare and media buying was through

MediaVest.



The campaign was written by Ian Heartfield and art directed by Matt

Doman.



Marcus Vinton was the creative director and the photographer was Adam

Hinton.



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