Polycell’s ’tick’ ads seek to reclaim DIY roots for brand

Polycell is attempting to reassert its authority in the DIY market with new TV advertising which exploits its well-known ’tick’ logo.

Polycell is attempting to reassert its authority in the DIY market

with new TV advertising which exploits its well-known ’tick’ logo.



Three ten-second commercials - the first to be produced by Publicis

since the agency picked up the pounds 1.5 million account six months ago

- break nationally this Thursday under the theme: ’It only takes two

ticks’.



The campaign is designed to coincide with the expected upsurge in DIY

activity over Easter. Each spot focuses on a different product -

wallpaper adhesives, wallpaper stripper or Light & Easy filler - using a

combination of live action and the latest digital techniques.



Written by Tago Byers and art directed by Fernando Sobron, the

commercial uses the ’tick’ to demonstrate how each product works but

also to reinforce the Polycell brand.



The ads are the first to be directed by Rob Kelly, of Lambie Nairn

Directors, since his move into commercials from TV graphic design. Media

buying is through TMD Carat.



The advertising signifies a return by Polycell to its home-decorating

roots - it diversified into areas such as plumbing and home security in

the late 80s.



Gerry Moira, the Publicis executive creative director, said: ’The

challenge was to represent a broad spectrum of product on a modest

budget. We’ve done that with some ingenious films that celebrate the

fact Polycell had its ’tick’ before Nike.’



Polycell is working on product extensions to its range as it attempts to

match the likes of Ronseal as a major DIY brand and ward off the growing

threat of own-labels.



The campaign is the first since Polycell renewed its links with John

Wringe, the Publicis client services director, who previously ran the

account for eight years at Cogent. ’The advantage of the advertising is

its flexibility,’ he said. ’It can be used for any product and doesn’t

have to be confined to the usual DIY demo.’



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