Publicis highlights London’s wild side in US ad campaign

London is trumpeting its growing reputation as the pace-setting centre of Europe with a new advertising campaign created by Publicis for the US market.

London is trumpeting its growing reputation as the pace-setting

centre of Europe with a new advertising campaign created by Publicis for

the US market.



The print work aims to boost the current pounds 1.2 billion spent by

American tourists in London each year by setting it apart from the other

world cities which compete for tourists’ dollars.



The advertising, which will run in six key US cities in newspapers and

consumer magazines until March, challenges the traditional perceptions

of London as an historical city which looks to the past under the theme

’London’s wild’.



Paul Hopper, managing director of the London Tourist Board, said: ’Our

research shows that the average American tends to think of London as a

bit of a living museum when, in fact, we are now at the cutting-edge of

fashion, eating and lifestyle.’



He added: ’The US market is crucial to London and we must market it

imaginatively and aggressively if we are to outpace the fierce

competition from other world cities.’



The ads, which were art directed by Molly Godet, are some of the last

work by Brian O’Connor, the art director who died in June last year. His

work was completed by Ken Dampier, who is now freelancing at the

agency.



Ten million high-spending professionals in New York, Chicago, Boston,

Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington are being targeted by the

Heritage Department, British Airways, American Express, the Radisson

Edwardian hotels group and the British Tourist Authority.



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