RAB polls creatives in effort to produce radio ’hall of fame’

The Radio Advertising Bureau is undertaking its most extensive piece of research into radio creativity which will culminate in a ’Hall of Fame’ of radio ads later this year.

The Radio Advertising Bureau is undertaking its most extensive

piece of research into radio creativity which will culminate in a ’Hall

of Fame’ of radio ads later this year.



Two hundred and fifty top creatives and advertisers will be asked to

nominate their top three radio ads of all time. Based on the findings, a

chart will be compiled and a special book printed, which will be sent

out to 8,000 industry players.



Letters are going out this week, along with a cassette of previous

winners of the RAB’s Aerial awards and D&AD’s radio category to act as

prompts.



’This is the largest-ever research into people’s opinion of radio

advertising and we aim to showcase all that’s great in commercial

radio,’ Steve Cox, the RAB’s head of training who is leading the

project, explained.



’Our archive has 25 years worth of radio ads in it, so people can vote

for whatever they want. We are expecting the content of the hall of fame

to largely comprise ads from the UK over the past 25 years, though ones

from abroad are also valid.’



The book, which will go out towards the autumn, will be in glossy format

in the style of the D&AD Copy Book.



Cox added: ’This is meant to stimulate agencies into using radio, and to

make the ones that already do famous.’



Justin Sampson, the operations director of the RAB, added: ’We are using

well-recognised industry pundits to prove that there is lots of great

radio advertising.’



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