Royal London Insurance deals pounds 3m blow to Banks Hoggins FCB

Royal London Insurance is reviewing its pounds 3 million advertising account out of Banks Hoggins/FCB, dealing a further blow to the recently merged agency.

Royal London Insurance is reviewing its pounds 3 million

advertising account out of Banks Hoggins/FCB, dealing a further blow to

the recently merged agency.



The news follows the loss of the pounds 9 million Andrex business last

month, which wiped 8 per cent off Banks Hoggins/FCB’s total

billings.



Royal London is understood to have been unhappy with the latest TV

campaign created by FCB. The two ads, ’bank raid’ and ’wedding day’,

have performed badly in research. Sources close to the business said

viewers felt the branding on the commercials, which broke last autumn,

was not strong enough.



There has been speculation that the agency might lose the Royal London

account since the merger, due to a possible conflict with Barclay’s b2,

a Banks Hoggins client.



Stephen Humphreys, the head of Royal London’s corporate communications,

took the decision to review.



Humphreys took over responsibility for the company’s advertising in

January from the marketing director, Russell Clemence.



Clemence appointed FCB to the account in 1994 on the strength of a pitch

focusing on Royal London’s sales force. But in its latest campaign, FCB

moved away from that strategy in a bid to take the brand more

upmarket.



Humphreys confirmed that Royal London was talking to other agencies, but

denied that the company was conducting a formal review of its

advertising.



’We are having an overall look at Royal London’s communications strategy

and talking to alternative suppliers,’ he said.



Sven Olsen, the managing director of Banks Hoggins/FCB, refused to

comment.



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