Rubberstuffers film hit by protest before it is even screened

Complaints about a TV commercial showing gay lovemaking have started pouring into advertising watchdogs even though the ad has yet to be screened on a terrestrial channel.

Complaints about a TV commercial showing gay lovemaking have

started pouring into advertising watchdogs even though the ad has yet to

be screened on a terrestrial channel.



The Independent Television Commission and the Broadcast Advertising

Clearance Centre have received a spate of protests since news that the

gay charity, Rubberstuffers, had been given the go-ahead to run the

film.



The BACC said this week that the calls would not force it to reverse its

decision although if the trickle of protests turned to a flood it could

review its verdict.



The ITC has told callers to wait until they see the commercial before

they complain about it.



In the commercial, produced by Mitchell Patterson Grime Mitchell, a gay

couple kiss, undress and caress each other as part of a campaign to

promote the use of condoms by homosexuals.



Uisdean Maclean, the BACC’s head of advertising clearance, said: ’We’ve

had complaints from people saying how outrageous it is. But this film

breaks new ground and has been considered at the highest levels of the

BACC.’



The commercial cannot be screened before 11pm and Maclean said channels

would have to show care about the programmes around which it will be

shown.



Meanwhile, the protesters were condemned by Greg Page, the

Rubberstuffers communications co-ordinator. ’They are really complaining

about the subject matter rather than the content,’ he said. ’They’re

just exposing their prejudices.’



Leader, p21.



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