Sainsbury’s chooses Brann for online task

Brann has picked up the entire business for Sainsbury’s new nationwide home shopping service, the first service of its kind to be offered by one of the big four supermarkets.

Brann has picked up the entire business for Sainsbury’s new

nationwide home shopping service, the first service of its kind to be

offered by one of the big four supermarkets.



The agency has created a sub-brand called Orderline, and will also

handle direct mail communication to customers, the in-store branding,

and a new Website, designed in conjunction with IBM. Brann will also

help implement the scheme, including handling telephone orders and

enquiries through its own call centre in Bristol.



Orderline can be accessed by phone, fax or the Internet, and asks the

customer to assist in building up a personal catalogue, rather than use

the more cumbersome alternative of Sainsbury’s sending out a catalogue

of every single product available nationally.



The catalogue will be filled initially during a shopping trip by the

customer, during which he or she would scan every item likely to be

purchased at some stage in the future.



A bespoke catalogue is then produced which can be accessed through the

Internet, by the telephone or through a hard copy sent to the customer

Customers have been targeted initially through the Sainsbury’s



Reward Card database, although it is hoped customers from rival

supermarkets will also join the scheme.



Orderline was trialled in the Kenton store near Watford under the name

’Order and Collect’, and will now roll out across 32 larger stores

covering Britain’s big cities in the next six months.



Of the other three major supermarkets, Tesco also has a home shopping

service, though this is limited to Greater London and Leeds, and is

largely Internet-based.



Outside the big four, Iceland has a nationwide home-delivery scheme in

place, but the customer still has to visit the store to buy the

goods.



Under the Sainsbury’s scheme, customers can have goods delivered to

their doors for a pounds 5 fee, or for pounds 3.50 the goods will be

packed and ready for collection at the store.



Although Sainsbury’s has declined to disclose its investment in the

scheme, analysts have suggested that it would cost about pounds 5

million to implement.



Paul Kitcatt, the managing director of Brann in London, was unavailable

for comment as Campaign went to press.



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