St Luke's targets teens in drugs helpline work

The spotlight on teenagers taking drugs, following the revelations

about Prince Harry using cannabis, is set to increase with a £1.5

million campaign created by St Luke's to promote the National Drugs

Helpline.



Commissioned by the Home Office, the campaign aims to help achieve the

Government objectives of reducing the number of under-25s taking Class A

drugs.



The campaign, supported by the Department of Health and the Department

for Education and Skills, specifically targets 15- to 17-year-olds -

considered the age band in which the most exposure and experimentation

with Class A drugs begins.



The campaign aims to encourage young people to reconsider their reliance

on their friends for information on drugs and their side-effects.



The press ads show eight real teenagers on a night out answering a

question. One execution says: "What do you know about cocaine?", while

the other asks: "What do you know about ecstasy?". They offer

contradictory replies, both negative and positive. The last teenager is

a National Drugs Helpline representative, portrayed in the same style as

the others, but giving the correct information.



The radio ads feature teenagers answering similar questions. Night club

flyers, postcards and washroom posters will also hope to communicate

with teenagers in the places they are most likely to encounter

drugs.



The campaign was written by Tom Childs and art directed by Ed

Morris.



The press campaign was shot by Alan Clarke through Balcony Jump. Media

is planned by Manning Gottlieb Media. Press buying is by MediaCom and

radio buying is handled by OMD.



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