Stop and stare at what these nine brands did for the eclipse

You don't have to shield your eyes from social media during an eclipse - brands from DoubleTree by Hilton to Pizza Hut have found creative ways to capitalise on the total solar eclipse.

Stop and stare at what these nine brands did for the eclipse

As a total eclipse passed over the US, brands went out of their way to show they were over the moon. 

Some brands provided glasses or tutorials for how to make a DIY viewer to watch the eclipse safely. Others created eclipse-themed events and treats for people celebrating the rare happening.

Chiquita
Chiquita has hijacked what it calls the "total(-ly overrated) solar eclipse" and is telling people to instead look out for the "banana sun," the two moments before and after the solar eclipse when it claims it can "temporarily turn the sun into a giant banana."

DoubleTree by Hilton
DoubleTree by Hilton made a video showing a cookie and glass of milk mimicking the movements of the sun and moon during an eclipse. The brand is also encouraging fans on Instagram and Twitter to create their own cookie-and-milk eclipse-inspired videos with the hashtag #CookiEclipse. It will also send select participants a tin of DoubleTree Cookies.

Delta Air Lines
The airline also made a cookie-centric video acting out the eclipse.

Pizza Hut
The chain created a how-to video to demonstrate how the solar eclipse can be safely viewed through one of its pizza boxes.

Coca-Cola
The soft-drink maker also demonstrated how to make an eclipse viewer from a box.

Krispy Kreme
Select US and Canadian Krispy Kreme locations have been selling a limited-edition "eclipse" doughnut since Saturday.

Denny’s
Denny’s offered $4 all-you-can-eat "mooncakes" or moon-shaped buttermilk pancakes to customers.

Royal Caribbean
Bonnie Tyler will sing her 1983 hit Total Eclipse of the Heart during the eclipse on Royal Caribbean's Oasis of the Seas ship.

Warby Parker
Too bad for some enthusiasts: Warby Parker was giving away eclipse-viewing glasses, but quickly ran out of them.

A version of this article was first published by PRWeek

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