Taking the temperature at Wimbledon
A view from Chris Cardew

Taking the temperature at Wimbledon

It's the fourth day of Wimbledon (last Thursday), Andy Murray has just beaten Robin Haase in straight sets and the UK number four, James Ward has made it through to the third round. The mood at Wimbledon is one of contentment, and Mindshare has the data and the resource to create live feeds around the world. Chris Cardew, head of strategy at Mindshare reports.

Mindshare’s Loop Room, where a team of 20 people comprised of data analysts, digital designers, copywriters, creative, sports journalists and social media planners, are creating the work to distribute the live ‘Wimbledon feeling’ around the world.

So how did this happen? Rewind four months to a brief from our client Jaguar to maximise the impact of their sponsorship of Wimbledon.

We began to think about what Wimbledon means to us and it’s really about the emotion, the highs and lows of following a player you support. The link to the brand is simple - like driving a Jaguar, the feeling of Wimbledon is incredibly unique and special, a real theatre of emotions.

Of course, Jaguar could have made an emotionally charged TV ad and some big outdoor posters to declare this but instead they embraced our belief that the future of media is the place where technology, data and content collide and as a brand with a big innovation and technology story to tell,  they decided to do something brave and different.

The result is Feel Wimbledon. Instead of telling people that like driving a Jaguar, Wimbledon feels great, we decided to capture the amazing Wimbledon feeling, and share it with everyone.

So whether you were on a train home, or sat in the office (and not on Centre Court on a media jolly) Jaguar would make sure that you could Feel Wimbledon. 

Technology, data and real time content creation are at the heart of the activation. As far as data fuelled insight and content goes, this is pretty heavy duty stuff.

Working with bio-analytics and technology partner, Lightwave, we have created three data sources to enable us draw real time insights on people’s emotive response to the tennis and all the action around it. Maido have built www.feelwimbledon.com and are managing the CMS that enables us to deploy the feeling live to all media channels, paid and owned.

Sensory beacons have been placed on Centre Court, No.1 Court and Henman Hill to detect crowd density and motion via infrared cameras, and audio levels. Wearable devices capture individual fan emotive responses, through a live read of their heart rate, motion and audio levels. Whilst a live social feed is helping us detect the volume and sentiment of conversation around Wimbledon globally.

At any one point we can draw an individual, crowd and global response to the Championships through an astonishing amount of high-resolution data - on day one we collected 19 million rows of data from the wearables and beacons alone.

Data analysts are using the data to help us to identify people’s feelings, including: Heart rate deceleration to detect the audience reaction to key moments; Duration of the audience’s response – to find the heartfelt response versus polite cheering; Timbre of the audio, boo or cheer; Tension measured by increased heart rate and any increase in heart rate variability with a relatively low heart rate to detect positive versus negative emotive states.

Turning live data into a real time picture of Wimbledon is where the magic really happens. It is turned into beautiful visualizations with supporting commentary and context in relation to the most exciting match moments.

The content is then uploaded in real time to www.feelwimbledon.com, pushed out socially via paid and owned formats and beamed out to the UK through a national network of digital outdoor sites including those at Canary Wharf and Leicester Square.

So if you want to Feel Wimbledon right now, you can.

Chris Cardew is head of strategy at Mindshare.