Tefal summons four in centralisation bid

Tefal is centralising its pounds 30-pounds 40 million global creative account into a single agency for the first time.

Tefal is centralising its pounds 30-pounds 40 million global

creative account into a single agency for the first time.



The Paris-based kitchenware manufacturer has asked its roster shops,

Ogilvy and Mather and Ammirati Puris Lintas, to pitch alongside the

French giants, Publicis and BDDP.



APL currently handles Tefal’s pounds 2 million UK account and oversees

the brand in most of Europe, the Americas and South Africa. O&M has the

business in France and Asia.



The winner-takes-all pitch focuses on the main brand but may include

Rowenta, which is also owned by Tefal’s parent company, the SEB

group.



Agencies will go to Paris next week to be briefed on whether to use a

single umbrella campaign or a series of individual strategies. Tefal

products include pans and cookware and some electronic goods while the

Rowenta name is mainly synonymous with electrical appliances.



The first round of strategic pitches will take place at the end of

March, followed by creative presentations in May. Media is not thought

to be part of the review. A final decision is not expected until June at

the earliest.



No-one at either Tefal or the agencies shortlisted was available for

comment as Campaign went to press.



Tefal is thought to have sanctioned the shake-up after mixed financial

results for 1996, particularly in key European markets. Sales fell in

France by 1 per cent and in Germany by 12 per cent. The company hopes

that centralising its advertising will result in economies of scale as

well as greater creative control.



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