The Work: New Campaigns - UK

SKODA - THE BAKING OF FABIA
CREDITS
Project: The baking of Fabia
Client: Mary Newcombe, head of marketing, Skoda
Brief: Launch the new Fabia
Creative agency: Fallon
Writers/art directors: Chris Bovill, Jon Allison
Planner: Tamsin Davies
Media agency: MediaCom
Media planner: Sarah Leach
Production company: Gorgeous
Director: Chris Palmer
Editor: Paul Watts
Post-production: Tom Sparks
Audio Post-production: Wave Sound Studios
Exposure: TV, online, print, DM, showroom

THE LOWDOWN

Skoda is launching its new Fabia model with a "delectable" TV campaign. The 60-second spot, created by Fallon, follows a team of bakers, who are embarking on the culinary escapade of making an entirely edible car.

The confectioners are seen baking huge cakes and making reams of icing in their quest to create an edible car. The action is accompanied by Julie Andrews' rendition of My Favourite Things from the musical The Sound of Music.

With headlamps made from glacier mints, tyres made from black icing and an engine filled with golden syrup instead of oil and petrol, every single element of this vehicle is edible.

Skoda is aiming to highlight the fact that the Fabia is a car packed full of everyone's favourite things. It ends with the strapline: "The new Fabia. Full of lovely stuff."

The spot will be accompanied by a "baking of" film, which will be available on the Skoda website.

TRANSPORT FOR LONDON - SIGNS
CREDITS
Project: Signs
Client: Nigel Hanlon, group marketing and communications manager,
Transport for London
Brief: Show London how free and easy cycling in London can be
Creative agency: M&C Saatchi
Writer: Tom Drew
Art director: Uche Ezugwu
Planner: Anna Donaghey
Media agency: Mediaedge:cia
Production company: Sonny
Director: Emil Moller
Editor: Amanda Perry
Post-production: Absolute
Audio Post-production: 750mph
Exposure: London TV

THE LOWDOWN

The signs of a cycle lane rise up and glide through the city in M&C Saatchi's visually arresting ad for Transport for London. Pushing the merits of travelling by bike, the ad follows a sign on its journey through London's parks, junctions and streets. Just as a woman prepares to get into her car, she spots the cycle lane sign outside her window and, inspired by the sight, gets on her bike instead. The ad ends with the line: "You're better off by bike." The ad is accompanied by a track called Straight Lines by Dawn Landes.

VISION EXPRESS - WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE?
CREDITS
Project: What would you like to see?
Client: Karen Williams, marketing director, Vision Express
Brief: Increase awareness of the importance of sight
Creative agency: Miles Calcraft Briginshaw Duffy
Writer: Malcolm Duffy
Art director: Paul Briginshaw
Planner: Giles Hedger
Media agency: Universal McCann
Media planner: Tracey Stern
Production company: Wanted Films
Director: Selby
Editor: Dave Webb,
Post-production: The Moving Picture Company
Audio Post-production: Grand Central
Exposure: National TV

THE LOWDOWN

The explorer Sir Ranulph Fiennes and the model Lisa Butcher are among the stars fronting Miles Calcraft Briginshaw Duffy's first TV work for Vision Express, since winning the £7 million business earlier this year.

The campaign hinges on the importance of eyesight, and asks both celebrities and professionals: "What would you like to see?"

The campaign features two 30-second spots, which encourage customers to book an eye examination.

The first spot features celebrities, but the second one puts the spotlight on people who require good eyesight for their day-to-day jobs, including a pilot, a photographer and a teacher.

The ads close with the line: "Vision Express. What would you like to see?"

ADIDAS - IMPOSSIBLE STORY
CREDITS
Project: Impossible story
Client: Frith Hucks, global media manager, Adidas
Brief: Bring the "Impossible is nothing" mantra to life and make it
resonate with 17-year-old sports and music fans in the UK
Creative agency: Glue London
Writer: Lewis Raven
Art director: Adam King
Planner: Stuart Parkinson
Designers: Ben Pearce, Matt Verity
Exposure: Online

THE LOWDOWN

You've seen the likes of the footballer David Beckham tell you how he was able to overcome hardship in Adidas' "impossible is nothing" campaign. Now, glue London has created a viral that lets ordinary people on the street tell their own story ... well, sort of.

Users are invited to upload their picture and glide through a virtual sketched landscape achieving all kinds of implausible feats such as flying, clearing buildings and jumping out of aeroplanes.

Once you've finished your "film", you can send it on to friends in an e-mail and let them decide whether or not you've proved that "impossible is nothing".

BT - BT VISION
CREDITS
Project: BT Vision
Client: Lib Charlesworth, director of sales and marketing, BT Vision
Brief: Launch BT's new digital TV service, BT Vision
Creative agency: Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO
Writers/art directors: Phil Martin, Brian Campbell
Planner: Louise Nolder
Media agency: Starcom MediaVest
Media planner: n/s
Photography: Platon
Retouching: Platon
Exposure: National outdoor, press

THE LOWDOWN

BT launches its new digital TV service, BT Vision, with an integrated campaign that pushes its flexibility. It aims to challenge the likes of Sky and Virgin Media.

The print executions, created by Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO, feature brightly coloured silhouettes against a white background. In one, a gymnast, with an array of colours splayed across her body, is prancing through the air, alongside the text: "The super-stretchy, mega-bendy, flexible digital TV service."

Another poster shows the silhouette of a woman in profile, again covered in colour. The accompanying text reads: "Digital TV from British Tellycom has arrived."

The press campaign backs two new 60-second TV spots, starring Kris Marshall and Esther Hall.

DVLA - NO WAY OUT
CREDITS
Project: No way out
Clients: Haydn Madoc, head of compliance; Emily Meredith, head of
business improvement unit, DVLA; Yvonne Ridley, account director, COI
Brief: Car tax evasion
Creative agency: Delaney Lund Knox Warren & Partners
Writer: Richard Holmes
Art director: Remco Graham
Planner: Fern Miller
Media agency: Carat
Media planner: Greg Fuller
Production company: Outsider
Directors: Dom & Nic
Editor: Struan Clay, Final Cut
Post-production: Colin Oaten, Glassworks
Audio Post-production: Nigel Crowley, 750mph
Exposure: National TV

THE LOWDOWN

A young couple's night takes a turn for the worse in Delaney Lund Knox Warren & Partners' dramatic spot for the DVLA.

It's all smiles and laughter until, on returning to the car, a man watches it mutate and implode, as his girlfriend looks on in shock. Why this catastrophic chain of events? Because, despite his clean-shaven outward appearance, the man is a car-tax evader.

As the vehicle disintegrates, the voiceover warns viewers that if you don't pay your car tax on time, the DVLA has the power to clamp, tow or even crush your car.

The ad culminates with the car being crumpled into the size of a small cube and left at the man's feet. One oversight has cost this man his car, his girl and any last shred of dating dignity.

118 118 - MANIAC VIRAL
CREDITS
Project: Maniac viral
Client: Mark Evans, marketing director, 118 118
Brief: Amplify the recent TV campaign and tap into a new generation of
118 118 users
Creative agency: WCRS
Writer: David Cornmell
Art director: Jane Briers
Planner: n/a
Media agency: n/a
Media planner: n/a
Production company: Hungry Man
Exposure: Online

THE LOWDOWN

Those boys from 118 118 are back in Lycra pants and "dancing like they've never danced before", in the directory enquiries brand's latest viral.

The two-minute film, created by WCRS, brings the 70s duo prancing into the 80s, with a spoof of the classic Flashdance.

Dressed in leotards and leg-warmers, the hairy pair recreate the movie's famous dance routine to a special remix of the song Maniac.

118 118 is hoping the viral will help the brand tap into a new generation of users and supplement the recent TV campaign.

The viral is available on a specially created website developed by WCRS's sister digital agency Meme, which can be found at www.118118maniacs.co.uk.

NSPCC - TALKING DOLL, TALKING ROBOT
CREDITS
Project: Talking doll, talking robot
Client: John Grounds, director of communications, NSPCC
Brief: Encourage young people to speak out about abuse in their lives
Creative agency: Saatchi & Saatchi
Writer: Cassandra Yap
Art director: Marion Cohen
Planner: Jo Bartholomeu
Media agency: ZenithOptimedia
Media planner: Sheila Bowden
Production company: Academy Films
Director: Nick Gordon
Editor: Joe Guest, Final Cut
Post-production: The Moving Picture Company
Exposure: National TV, print, radio

THE LOWDOWN

Saatchi & Saatchi's latest campaign for the NSPCC urges children to speak out about, rather than conceal, domestic abuse.

The TV ads show a one-way relationship between abused children and their toys. In one spot, a talking doll reveals the secrets of her owner, Ellie, who is regularly punched by her mum. In the other, a toy robot talks about his mission to protect his owner, Joe, who gets locked in a dark place by his dad. The line is: "Without ChildLine, who would abused children talk to?"

The campaign is supported by three press ads. Each shows the public face of a child, with their troubled alter-ego in the background. Children are also directed to the campaign microsite, www.donthideit.com, where they can find out more information and seek help.

CHRISTIAN AID - CHRISTIAN AID WEEK 2007
CREDITS
Project: Christian Aid Week 2007
Client: Nick Burne, head of interactive, Christian Aid
Brief: Create a website that generates online donations during Christian
Aid Week 2007
Creative agency: GT
Writer: Scott Andrews
Art director: Leigh Gilbert
Planners: Pete McGarr, Julian Saunders
Media agency: MediaCom
Media planners: Jessica Gould, David Munt
Designers: Grant Clark, Travis McKeag
Exposure: Online, press, posters, door-drops

THE LOWDOWN

In GT's new microsite for Christian Aid Week 2007, an image of a red envelope unfolds into a prosperous village, highlighting the benefits of donating to the charity.

On the site (www.caweek.org), a three-dimensional envelope unravels to reveal what happens to the money people donate. First, a water tap emerges, then clean running water, and finally a flourishing village. The envelope then closes and displays ways of donating.

The site encourages users to e-mail "virtual envelopes" to their friends, as well as publicising a search engine, Surefish, that donates its profits to the charity.

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