Feature

The Work: New Campaigns - The World

AT&T - BEAT CITY - US
CREDITS
Project: Beat City
Client: AT&T
Brief: Promote the Sony Ericsson Walkman W350 phone
Creative agency: BBDO New York
Writer: Patrick Herold
Art director: Tim Zastera Wettstein
Media agency: Mediaedge:cia Global
Production company: Stardust
Director: Alan Bibby
Editor: Andrew Borin
Post-production: The Mill
Exposure: National TV, cable TV

THE LOWDOWN

AT&T draws inspiration from computer games in a new animated spot to promote the Sony Ericsson Walkman W350, a flip-phone that doubles as a music player. BBDO New York created the ad, which is directed at image-conscious young people who enjoy music.

Launched earlier this year, the phone boasts Bluetooth Stereo Streaming for wireless music listening. It also allows users to record a few seconds of a song and will then identify the artist and album.

The 1990s, a new Scottish band, recorded the soundtrack for the ad. As the music changes from rock to hip-hop electronic, the main character's clothing and background change accordingly.

FILA - SOCIETY OF SPORTS - CHINA
CREDITS
Project: Society of sports
Client: Joy Cai, PR/sports marketing manager, Fila China
Brief: Raise Fila's brand awareness in China
Creative agency: Bartle Bogle Hegarty China
Writers: Steve Sorec, Leo Zhang
Art director: Kat Bojcuk
Planner: Philip Man
Media agency: n/s
Photographer: Mark Law
Retouching: Magic Cube, Singapore
Exposure: National magazines, outdoor

THE LOWDOWN

Fila, the sportswear brand, has bucked the trend for featuring big-name athletes in its first advertising since the Beijng Olympics by showing everyday people who enjoy sports.

The campaign, which promotes the company's autumn and winter ranges, was created by Bartle Bogle Hegarty's Shanghai office.

The agency was appointed earlier this year, eight months after Fila China's exclusive trademark rights were acquired by Belle International Holdings, to build its presence in the country.

The advertising will support Fila's collections for a number of sports including skiing, golf, yoga and tennis.

MELTIN' POT - I DREAM. I AM - ITALY
CREDITS
Project: I dream. I am
Client: Marta Carichino, communications manager, Meltin' Pot
Brief: Support the Meltin' Pot autumn and winter collection
Creative agency: Armando Testa
Writers: Dario Digeronimo, Maria Meioli
Art directors: Michele Mariani, Luca Cortesini, Laura Sironi
Photographer: Eugenio Recuenco
Retouching: Paz Otero, Focal Imagen
Exposure: Print, outdoor

THE LOWDOWN

Meltin' Pot, the Italian upmarket jeans brand, draws on fairytale-type imagery in new print advertising to support its autumn and winter range.

Armando Testa created the campaign which, it says, aims to present the brand as an antidote to everyday dreariness and enhance its aspirational appeal.

The ads are based on the premise that, in dreams, anything is possible. In one, a lion appears to be dancing with a woman in a ball gown. In another, a man with jump leads prepares to wake Sleeping Beauty.

Founded in the early 90s, Meltin' Pot adopted the US hip-hop culture and adapted it to suit European tastes and styles.

The brand has outlets in France and Germany, with others due to open in London, New York and Los Angeles.

DE VOLKSKRANT - NEED TO KNOW - THE NETHERLANDS
CREDITS
Project: Need to know
Client: Fokko Vonk, brand manager, De Volkskrant
Brief: Underline De Volkskrant's inquisitive nature
Creative agency: Selmore, Amsterdam
Writer: Tomas Miken
Art directors: Albert Vegers, Tjerk-Jan Oord
Media agency: n/a
Production company: Comrad
Director: Willem Gerritsen
Editor: Martin Heijgelaar
Post-production: AVP
Audio Post-production: Marcel Bultman, FC Walvisch
Exposure: National TV

THE LOWDOWN

De Volkskrant, the Dutch daily newspaper, is turning to TV advertising to promote its inquisitive character and ability to provoke comment and controversy.

Its campaign is based on the heated debate over genetically motified food and a commercial that asks viewers: "Are we playing God, or simply making intelligent use of new technology?"

The idea grew out of a stunt staged by the paper's agency, Selmore, in which cucumbers shaped like question-marks appear to have been grown in a laboratory. It then recorded consumers' reactions as they discovered the manipulated vegetables in supermarkets.

De Volkskrant is the third biggest-selling daily in The Netherlands behind Der Telegraaf and Algemeen. Fokko Vonk, its brand manager, said: "De Volkskrant questions existing issues in society."